Tip For Night Fishing For Salmon on Lake Michigan

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With fall almost upon us it’s time to start thinking Kings & Coho Salmon close to the shore and in the harbors of Lake Michigan,, One of my favorite & most productive techniques is to Night Fish using Ivory or Fire tiger Rat L Traps painted with good quality Glow In The Dark Paint. I prefer to use Ultra Green V10 Glow in the Dark Paint on any of my lures, spoons & ice jigs that I use.

Fishing from shore my presentation will vary, after casting count down the lure about 10 seconds and start the retrieve, generally I will use a slow steady retrieve with a light jerk every few cranks, at times a fast retrieve, stop, hard jerk works too..

When fishing from the boat, the same retrieves as shore fishing work great, But my favorite & deadliest tactic is jigging the traps, fast quick snaps up and let the lure flutter back down, You can really cover a lot of the water column  this way!..

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NEW ONLINE TOOL TO REPORT ROUND GOBIES

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NEW ONLINE TOOL TO REPORT ROUND GOBIES
Beginning today, anglers have a new, mobile-friendly way to report findings of unwanted gobies in the lower Fox River above the Rapide Croche Dam and in Lake Winnebago in northeast Wisconsin. Round gobies are destructive aquatic invaders that can survive even in poor quality water and displace native fish by eating their eggs and young, taking over optimal habitat and spawning multiple times per season, which gives them a competitive advantage. Anglers who catch a round goby should kill it and if they have access to a mobile device, immediately submit a report of their catch to DNR via an online survey tool http://statictab.com/pfr8sdh You can also submit a report on our Facebook page by clicking “report goby” at the top of our page.

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A Primer on Fishing Hooks

Fishing Hooks
As a rule, use the smallest hook possible. Small hooks allows the live-bait presentation to look natural. Small hooks also penetrate quicker than larger hooks upon the fish strike. Always test your hook for sharpness. Sharp hook points will catch more fish than dull hooks. To test your hook simply draw the hook point across your fingernail, a sharp hook will leave a light scratch and digs in to your nail. A dull hook will skate across your nail with out digging in. When necessary touch up the hook point by using a hook file or sharpening stone, simply draw the hook sharpener against the point of your hook a few times (parallel to the shank) on the bottom, and then take a couple of quick strokes to each side of the hook

Don’t be misled that new hooks out of the box are always sharp especially the cheap hooks that are made of soft poor quality steel. Even high quality hooks will dull over time and use by hitting rocks and debris in the water.

Another option is to use chemically sharpened hooks. Many quality hook manufactures offer a line of hooks that are made of higher grade steel and then dipped in a chemical bath which gives the hook a super sharp hook point. These hooks can be expensive compared to conventional hooks, but the advantage is a super sharp hook right out of the package. The bottom line is always use a sharp hook.

Hook Sizes
When it comes to hook sizes it tends to be little confusing. There is no standard when it comes to classifying a hook size, generally when a single number is used such as size 12 verses a size 8 the higher the number the smaller the hook. The classification system ranges from 1 largest to 32 smallest. To make it more confusing hooks that are sized using a fraction type, for example 5/0 ( pronounced five – aught) compared to a 1/0 the sizing system is reversed so the higher the number the larger the hook. 1/0 is the smallest up to the largest hook at 19/0

The Anatomy of a Fish Hook
The parts fish hook are referred as: It’s point- the sharp end that penetrates the fish’s mouth or flesh; the barb – the projection extending backwards from the point, that secures the fish from unhooking; the eye – the end of the hook that is connected to the fishing line or lure; the bend and shank – that portion of the hook that connects the point and the eye; and the gap – the distance between the shank and the point.
Fishing with Hooks, Sinkers, Bobbers & Rigging Fishing with Hooks, Sinkers, Bobbers & Rigging

Popular Common Hook Types:

Fishing with Hooks, Sinkers, Bobbers & Rigging
Aberdeen
Light wire long shank hook, perfect for Panfish, Crappie and light biting Walleyes under a slip bobber or attached bobber rig. The light wire limits excessive puncturing on minnows which helps them live longer on the hook, the long shank allows the angler easy removal of the hook from panfish that tends to swallow the bait.
Fishing with Hooks, Sinkers, Bobbers & Rigging
Bait Holder
The bait holder hook is one of the most popular live bait hook styles today, the additional barbs on the shank holds the bait more effectively, such as night crawlers leeches and red worms.
Fishing with Hooks, Sinkers, Bobbers & Rigging
Circle
Circle hooks are a excellent choice for live bait catch and release anglers. Upon a fish swallowing your bait, the inward bend of the hook point allows the hook to slide along the inside of the fish’s throat until it reaches the mouth. A sharp pulling hook set is not required, just maintain tension and the fish will hook itself in the corner of the mouth as the fish moves away. The lip hook rate using a circle hook is about 95% it also reduces the mortality rate of fish to be released to fight another day. Very popular hook for Catfish, Sturgeon and Muskies anglers.
Fishing with Hooks, Sinkers, Bobbers & Rigging
Egg
Commonly called salmon egg hook, designed with a turned up eye and offset bend, so the hook rides upward along with the placement of a barb on the shank which holds the bait. The salmon egg hook is used primarily for drift fishing along current by using natural or imitation salmon eggs, spawn sacs, worms and grubs for Salmon and Trout.
Fishing with Hooks, Sinkers, Bobbers & Rigging
Octopus
The extra gap and rounded shape of Octopus hooks are very popular and used for most species of fish. The Octopus is ideal for rigging cut bait for Catfish or Salmon, minnows for Bass, Pike and Walleyes and are good choice for building crawler harnesses. They are available in a assortment of painted or metallic colors.

Fishing with Hooks, Sinkers, Bobbers & Rigging
Rotating
A special compound curve on the offset/rotating hook automatically turns when a fish bites on the bait. The sweeping rotational curve places the point in position for penetration from any angle. The offset/ rotating hook twists, holds bait better and hooks fish better.
Fishing with Hooks, Sinkers, Bobbers & Rigging
Treble
Treble hooks are a single eye of three hooks fused together with three shanks evenly spaced. The treble is mainly used on artificial lures and spoons attached by using a split ring. Treble hooks today comes in a assortment of colors as well as feathers tied on as a trailer/teaser hook on lures.

Fishing with Hooks, Sinkers, Bobbers & Rigging
Weedless
The weedless hook has a light wire wrapped on the shank formed in a loop that covers the point of the hook. This allows the hook to be fished in weeds logs, trees, stumps, rocks and lily pads. Upon a fish striking the bait the wire compresses exposing the hook point.

Fishing with Hooks, Sinkers, Bobbers & Rigging

A Special thanks to our friends at learninghowtofish.com for this article

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Lake Delavan fall live bait rigging for big walleyes and big Largemouth Bass.

Now that labor day has come & gone and cooler fall like temps in the forecast, I thought I would share this video from Oct. 2014 from Eric Haataja.. Enjoy!

Fishing Report October 2014 Lake Delavan fall live bait rigging for big walleyes and big Largemouth Bass. How to live bait rig in fall. Fishing tips. Fishing videos. Walleye fishing videos. Bass fishing. Live bait videos. How to fish videos. Eric Haataja. Fishing for walleyes. Fishing tips for bass. Big fish videos.

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Illinois Cuffs & Collars – September 4th, 2015

Illinois Cuffs & Collars – September 4th, 2015

Region I – Capt. Laura Petreikis

CPO Jones checked three squirrel hunters at French Bluff Natural Area on opening day. Two of the three squirrel hunters were hunting without habitat stamps and did not print off windshield permits. CPO Jones issued written warnings for no habitat stamp and failure to display windshield permits.

A 45-year-old man from Rochelle was hiding out at White Pines State Park and wanted on a warrant when CPO Beltran ran a computer check on his license plate and discovered he was wanted, armed and dangerous. The man was taken into custody without incident and transported to Ogle County jail.

While executing a search warrant, the Boone County Sheriff’s Department recognized various wildlife taxidermy mounts within the defendant’s residence and called CPO Alt to ensure none of the mounts were threatened, endangered or unlawful to possess.

CPO Finn received a call from Sgt. Frazier about men using a cast net to catch crappies and bass at Lock 2 of the Hennepin Canal. CPO Finn arrived to find four men standing along the bank, one of which was throwing a cast net. The men were observed throwing the cast net and two of the men were keeping bait fish, however two others were keeping game fish. Three of the men were cited for the illegal method of taking game fish. All four were given warnings for the illegal use of the cast net.

While checking fishermen at LaSalle Lake, CPO Kaufman found a man in possession of alcohol and a short smallmouth bass. When they walked back to the man’s vehicle, CPO Kaufman found that the vehicle was parked in a handicapped spot with a handicapped placard hanging from the rear view mirror. The man did not appear to be disabled so CPO Kaufman ran the placard number. The placard had been issued to the man’s mother. The man was issued three citations, including one for the misuse of the handicapped placard.

CPO Lazzell investigated a recreational boat accident on the Mississippi River near Oquawka. A 16-foot jon boat struck a sandbar and began taking on water due to the watercraft being overloaded. The maximum capacity for this size watercraft is four persons. Seven adults and two Labrador retrievers were on the vessel at the time of the incident. The operator of the boat, all passengers and dogs were safely transported to the boat ramp by emergency personnel. Citations were issued for overloaded motorboat and insufficient wearable PFDs. Four written warnings were also issued for additional boating violations.

Region II – Capt. Brett Scroggins

CPO Whitchurch observed an individual fishing at an DNR-owned and managed lake who was fishing with four active lines when the limit was two. The subject was also observed entering the water on foot a long ways into the water. CPO Whitchurch advised the subject of the two poles and line limit and also the restrictions pertaining to wading and swimming. A fishing license check on the subject was conducted. The subject provided CPO Whitchurch with a fishing license which after further investigation was deemed to belong to the subject’s brother. The subject was issued multiple citations for the offenses. The fishing license was taken and given back into the custody of the proper owner. The rightful owner was not aware his fishing license missing.

Illegal fishing details were conducted along the Fox River at each of the river dams, resulting in the arrest of three separate parties for illegally taking sport fish with cast nets. CPO Siedsma responded to one complaint from a local angler who reported one incident, four subjects were issued citations for the unlawful use of cast net to take sport fish and possession of several sport and undersized fish. In addition to responding to complaints, CPOs regularly conducted surveillance operations during peak times resulting in the arrest of another two groups, five subjects in total were charged for the unlawful use of cast net to take sport fish, along with additional appropriate charges.

CPOs Hurt and Schreiber were conducting routine boat patrol on the Fox Chain ‘O Lakes. In a no-wake channel between Grass Lake and Lake Marie, they observed a boat repeatedly powering up and down and steering from side to side. Upon contact with the operator and during the course of a boat safety inspection, it became evident the operator was impaired. The operator was brought onto the patrol boat and field sobriety testing was administered. A preliminary breath test was administered, which registered a .175 BAC. The operator was arrested for operating a watercraft under the influence of alcohol. The operator refused to submit an evidential breath sample. The operator was additionally cited for violation of no wake area. The boat was towed and the operator was released on a notice to appear.

CPOs Hurt and Schreiber responded to a personal injury boat accident on Round Lake. The ensuing investigation determined two friends were operating PWCs in circles in close proximity to each other when the bow of one PWC impacted the port side of the other PWC, ejecting the operator of the struck PWC into the water and rendering him unconscious face-down in the water.  The other operator entered the water and rendered aid and the two operators were taken to shore by a Good Samaritan boater.  One operator was transported to Advocate Condell Hospital and was released later that evening. Both operators were cited for careless operation of a watercraft, operation of unnumbered watercraft, and were given mandatory court dates.

CPOs Wollgast and Honiotes responded to a boating accident involving property damage on the Kankakee River in Kankakee County. A female operator had asked permission to ride a personal watercraft that was in possession of some associates. She promptly drove the PWC directly into a pontoon boat a short distance away. In her attempt to return to shore, she drove the PWC directly into and over a dock. The owner of the PWC could not be identified as the people involved were uncooperative. Eventually, a title for the PWC and trailer was produced, both of which were “open,” having been signed by the original owner but not transferred to the “new” owner, who still remained unidentified. The PWC was seized as evidence to be processed and further investigation continues as to the owner’s identity. Charges are pending.

 

Region III – Capt. Jim Mayes

CPOs Barnes and Moody were on patrol in Cumberland County along the Embarras River when they observed two men from Neoga fishing.  As the officers approached the subjects they observed a “hitter” pipe made out of deer antler sitting in the bed of the truck where one subject was standing. The subject admitted it was his pipe and also had a bag of cannabis in his pocket. The subject was arrested for possession of cannabis and drug paraphernalia. The other subject was cited for no fishing license.

While checking fishermen at the Denham Pit Access along the Kaskaskia River, CPO Moody arrested a Decatur man for fishing with no valid license, fleeing, obstructing identification, as well as a $15,000 warrant out of Piatt County. After giving CPO Moody a fake name and birthdate, the man fled through the woods. With it being dark and the man not knowing the area, he hurt his leg while running through the woods and eventually was found after giving up running. The man also panicked when he saw the headlights of the squad prior to being checked and threw his fishing pole into the middle of the river to make it look as if he wasn’t fishing. The man was taken to the Moultrie County Jail where the paramedics checked on him.

CPOs Reeves and Graden were conducting boat patrol on Clinton Lake. At approximately 9:30 p.m., they stopped a vessel for violating a posted no wake zone. The operator exhibited slurred speech, a strong odor of alcoholic beverage was present about his boat and he displayed indicators of impairment during afloat field sobriety testing. Subsequently, the 47-year-old male, from Monticello, was arrested for unlawful operation of a watercraft under the influence of alcohol. He submitted to an evidential breath test which disclosed his blood alcohol concentration was .122 percent.

CPO Reeves made an arrest of two male subjects form Decatur for possession of cannabis and drug paraphernalia. The arrest occurred while CPO Reeves was checking fishermen off of the Dewitt Bridge at Clinton Lake.

Region IV – Capt. Jamie Maul

CPO Weishaupt responded to an abandoned boat found adrift on the Mississippi River with fishing gear in it. The owner of the boat was eventually located, even though the registered owner was not the owner of the boat. The boat was returned and a citation was issued for failure to transfer certificate of number. CPO Weishaupt also identified the above subject as the person who had dumped a couch and chair at Red’s Landing Boat Ramp parking lot. The subject confessed to the dumping, and a citation was issued for illegal dumping.

CPO Goetten checked a fisherman on the Illinois River. Upon inspecting the subject’s fishing license, CPO Goetten discovered discrepancies in the listed physical indicators. An interview was conducted and it was determined the subject could not obtain a fishing license due to back pay on child support. The fishing license presented belonged to an acquaintance. He was arrested for obstructing a police officer and fishing without a license and transported to the Jersey County jail.

CPO Elliott conducted sport fish enforcement in Mason County at Riverfront Park in Havana. The eight boat safety inspections and six sport fishing checks resulted in CPO Elliott issuing five written warnings ranging from operation of a watercraft without a lanyard (three), battery cover (one), and Type IV throwable seat cushion (one). CPO Elliott explained the importance of each violation and how to correct them.

CPO Wichern charged a subject with unlawfully capturing a baby mallard hen during closed season and leg banding her with black zip ties on a private pond south of Jacksonville.

CPOs Wichern, Blakeley and Cochran received a call from a commercial fisherman who reported 5-8 missing hoop nets a couple days before. CPOs Wichern, Blakely, and Cochran responded to the location. After a brief interview of a suspect by the three CPOs, the suspect admitted to taking six nets and was charged with six counts of disturbing commercial fishing gear.

Region V – Capt. Tim Daiber

CPO Folden concluded an investigation involving information forwarded by a Hamilton County Sheriff’s Deputy in  regards to poaching deer in Hamilton County. CPO Folden took the information and successfully identified several violations of the wildlife code from the 2014 deer season and even unlawful take of deer in Hamilton County during June 2015. The three subjects identified to be involved received a total of 20 citations. CPO Folden seized two compound bows, one shotgun, and two deer racks. Total deer identified to have been illegally harvested was five. The charges included unlawful take of deer during a closed season, unlawful use of lights from a vehicle to take deer, unlawful take of deer between half hour after sunset and half hour before sunrise, unlawful hunting after already harvesting the legal limit, and wanton waste.

CPO Jourdan investigated a report of a wolf in captivity in Jefferson County. The animal turned out to be a hybrid from a wolf and a domesticated dog.

CPO Mohrman investigated a fall from a cliff which occurred at Giant City State Park. A 17-year-old subject attempting to rock climb fell approximately 30 feet off a cliff edge landing on the wooden boardwalk of the Giant City Nature  Trail. Due to the head trauma incurred by the youth, he was airlifted to a hospital in St. Louis. Fortunately the subject had no broken bones or internal injuries and only suffered scrapes and bruises. The subject stated to CPO Mohrman that he did not break any bones because he “drinks a lot of milk.”

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